Weekend Writing Prompt #267- Return

A word prompt to get your creativity flowing this weekend.  How you use the prompt is up to you.  Write a piece of flash fiction, a poem, a chapter for your novel…anything you like.  Or take the challenge below – there are no prizes – it’s not a competition but rather a fun writing exercise.  If you want to share what you come up with, please leave a link to it in the comments.

Word Prompt

Return

Challenge

wk 267 return

Weekend Writing Prompt #267: This weekend your challenge is to write a poem or a piece of prose in exactly 31 words using the word “Return”.

The challenge is simple: each week you will be given an exact number of words you can use to write a poem or piece of prose.  You can use any format or style you like; go wherever your inspiration takes you.  The only rules are these:

  • your poem / prose must contain this week’s word (see note below).  The word does not have to count towards the exact word count total – it can be in the title, or the first letters of the lines of a poem can spell it out – you can be as creative as you want as long as it’s there somewhere.
  • the length of your poem / prose must match the number of words stated in this week’s challenge.  No more.  No less.
  • A note on the word: you can use any variation of the word (for example: call, calls, calling, called etc).  If you find you are struggling to use this week’s word you may substitute it for a synonym – just include a note to explain the swap.  Remember, this is supposed to be fun! 🙂

Can’t wait to read what you have come up with!


Whispers and Echoes – is an online journal of short writing – read it here *
Check out the journal’s submission guidelines here – now open for general submissions

Weekend Writing Prompt Year 1 Anthology: Outcast and Other Words – Read for free here

Tolkien Tuesday #25

~ 05 July 2022 ~

This the first time in a couple of weeks that I’ve managed to post this on the right day! Woohoo! However, I am still a terrible read-along hostess as I am still behind with comments. I hang my head in shame. I would like to think I might get around to them by the end of the week, but be forewarned…it’s equally possible I may not. Sigh…

The Reading, and Ensuing Thoughts

This week we finish Book 2, Chapter 1 of The Fellowship of the Ring, Many Meetings.

Gloin, keeping the conversation neutral, regales Frodo with all that has been going on at the Lonely Mountain and its surrounds. Frodo says he would like to see Bilbo again, more than anything.

After the feast, the gathering moves to the Hall of Fire, to listen to music, songs and stories. Frodo spots a small figure by the fire who looks to be asleep. Elrond wakes him, though he wasn’t really asleep, and beckons Frodo over. It’s Bilbo, who has been busy composing a song which Elrond wishes to hear that night. But Bilbo claims he needs help from his friend, who is sought out, and it turns out to be Strider.

While they are waiting for him to appear, Bilbo asks Frodo about the ring, and asks to see it. Although Frodo is reluctant, he shows it to him. Bilbo reaches out to touch it and Frodo pulls backs, causing a terrible transformation in Bilbo. Bilbo, on seeing the look of distress on Frodo’s face, immediately understands, and returns to being himself once more.

Bilbo and Strider leave to finish writing the song, and Frodo is left alone to think and ponder. He falls quickly into an almost-dream like state, but eventually he comes to hear Bilbo’s voice as he performs his latest song about Earendil.

Afterwards, Bilbo and Frodo slip away. Retiring to Frodo’s room, they exchange stories of all the wonderful things they had seen on their adventures, avoiding any darker subjects.. A while later, Sam turns up, on Gandalf’s orders, to remind Frodo he needs to rest ahead of the Council tomorrow, so Bilbo takes his leave, to go walk beneath the stars before bed.

Photo by Erik Mclean on Pexels.com

Although we’ve made mention of the “master and servant” dynamic of Frodo and Sam’s friendship before, I don’t think it was as awkwardly obvious as it was in this chapter, or at least, that’s how it came across to me. I hated how Bilbo referred to Frodo as “your master” when he was speaking to Sam, even though the tone was not one of reminding him of his station.

I loved spending time in the Hall of Fire. Gandalf’s description of it was wonderful! I could have pulled up a chair by the fire and listened to the songs and stories until I drifted off into an enchanted dream myself…

Next week we begin Book 2 Chapter 2, The Council of Elrond.

Middle Earth Musings and Meditations

This week my musing is inspired by Bilbo Baggins himself, and I think it is something many of us can identify with. First, the quote:

“…I have written some more of my book. And, of course, I make up a few songs. They sing them occasionally: just to please me, I think; for, of course, they aren’t really good enough for Rivendell…”

Imposter syndrome. It was this which was brought to mind on the reading of that passage. What is it? A feeling of inadequacy and crippling self-doubt when it comes to one’s own gifts and talents. As Bilbo points out, the idea that we, or our work, or our art, is not good enough and hasn’t earned the attention or praise it is being shown.

Yet, I can’t imagine elves, who are often considered to be lofty and aloof, wasting their time and effort on sub-standard offerings, all in the name of politeness, even if they are kind. Can you?

And, if we are looking for a real world equivalent, this also goes for publishers, reviewers, readers and those kind enough to leave supportive, encouraging comments full of praise in the comment section of our blogs too. Publishers don’t have to accept our work, reviewers don’t have to leave reviews, and no-one has to take the time to tell you they enjoyed your poem or piece of flash fiction. They do it because they see merit in it. They do it because they were moved by your creative expression to do so. It can be so difficult to remember that sometimes.

Why do we find it so hard to believe in ourselves? Why do we find it so hard to accept compliments?

Elsewhere

Although we’ve briefly discussed some of the other books written by Tolkien, about Tolkien, and about Middle Earth, and although I’ve mentioned attempting to catalogue my collection of books on Goodreads (and struggling with multiple editions – I’ve not yet looked into your suggestion, Joy, I will get to it!) I’ve never taken a look at Tolkien’s author page on Goodreads until this week…

If you’re looking for a potted biography of Tolkien, I can highly recommend it. It feels a little repetitive for something so short, but all the main points are there. And the most mind-blowing fact on the page? 520 distinct works…

The Lord of the Rings Question of the Week:

If you could only pick one of the following to do in Rivendell, all taken from Book 2, Chapter 1, which would it be?

  1. Attend a feast
  2. Listen to music and songs in the Hall of Fire
  3. Look at the stars of Elbereth in the garden
Photo by Alex Andrews on Pexels.com

When I was writing this question, I had anticipated choosing 2, and, on any other day I probably would have. The Hall of Fire sounds so wonderful – it sounds like a dream come true. Yet when I read that final sentence of the chapter, where Bilbo said of his intentions to go out for a walk in the garden and look at the stars…I just wanted to go with him! So, at this moment in time, my answer is definitely 3, no matter that you can see the stars pretty much anywhere in Middle Earth, unless you’re under a mountain or in a cave. I think it would be so special to simply sit and stare up into the night sky and enjoy the gentleness, the serenity of the moment.

Weekend Writing Prompt #266- Flippant

A word prompt to get your creativity flowing this weekend.  How you use the prompt is up to you.  Write a piece of flash fiction, a poem, a chapter for your novel…anything you like.  Or take the challenge below – there are no prizes – it’s not a competition but rather a fun writing exercise.  If you want to share what you come up with, please leave a link to it in the comments.

Word Prompt

Flippant

Challenge

wk 266 flippant

Weekend Writing Prompt #266: This weekend your challenge is to write a poem or a piece of prose in exactly 74 words using the word “Flippant”.

The challenge is simple: each week you will be given an exact number of words you can use to write a poem or piece of prose.  You can use any format or style you like; go wherever your inspiration takes you.  The only rules are these:

  • your poem / prose must contain this week’s word (see note below).  The word does not have to count towards the exact word count total – it can be in the title, or the first letters of the lines of a poem can spell it out – you can be as creative as you want as long as it’s there somewhere.
  • the length of your poem / prose must match the number of words stated in this week’s challenge.  No more.  No less.
  • A note on the word: you can use any variation of the word (for example: call, calls, calling, called etc).  If you find you are struggling to use this week’s word you may substitute it for a synonym – just include a note to explain the swap.  Remember, this is supposed to be fun! 🙂

Can’t wait to read what you have come up with!


Whispers and Echoes – is an online journal of short writing – read it here *
Check out the journal’s submission guidelines here – now open for general submissions

Weekend Writing Prompt Year 1 Anthology: Outcast and Other Words – Read for free here

Tolkien Tuesday #24…a day late

~ 29 June 2022 ~

Only a day late this week…somehow that feels like progress!

The Reading, and Ensuing Thoughts

This week we begin Book 2, Chapter 1 of The Fellowship of the Ring, Many Meetings.

Photo by Emre Can Acer on Pexels.com

Frodo wakes in Rivendell, to learn from Gandalf that Elrond has spent days tending to the wound he received on Weathertop. Gandalf then proceeds to tell him that he had started to turn into a wraith like the Black Riders, who are the Ringwraiths, the Nine Servants of the Lord of the Rings. He also explains his absence in the briefest possible terms: he was held captive.

Frodo can’t remember how he got to Rivendell, nor can he recall everything which happened at the ford, and begs Gandalf to fill in the blanks of his memory. The river is under the command of Elrond, and when he requires it to bar the way to those unwelcome in this valley, it rises and floods, as it did that day, washing away their enemies.

Frodo is reunited with Sam, Merry and Pippin, and then they all attend a feast. Frodo is a guest at the high table, and is seated next to Gloin, one of Bilbo’s companions on his adventure to the Lonely Mountain. Frodo also sees for the first time, Elrond’s daughter, Arwen.

I felt this was quite a gentle passage in the story. For the moment they are safe, and the calm atmosphere of Rivendell permeates the text and becomes a tangible thing, even when discussing the difficulties they’ve had to endure since leaving the Shire. Also, Pippin’s humorous side makes a welcome appearance in this first half of the chapter, and I thought here he was closer to how he is portrayed in the movies.

Next week we will conclude Book 2 Chapter 1, Many Meetings.

Middle Earth Musings and Meditations

My musing this week is on the use of the series title in the narrative.

I always feel that this is somehow a momentous occasion when it first appears (in all books, not just this one). And that it’s spotting should be accompanied by an exclamation of something along the lines of “Ah, there it is!”

I’m not entirely sure why I feel it’s an important marker in a story. I wonder if it has something to do with the characters and the readers both being conscious of this same nugget of information contained within the title…I don’t know…

The first time was by Gandalf when he’s explaining to Frodo who the Black Riders are. The second time, Pippin, jesting, calls Frodo “Lord of the Ring” and then when Gandalf pulls him up on it, he quips ironically that the wizard “…has been saying many cheerful things…”

Is it only me who notices things like this? Or do you notice it too?

Elsewhere

Jen Goldie kindly left a link to her blog post on Howard Shore on Tolkien Tuesday #22 in which I was discussing the soundtrack to The Lord of the Rings film trilogy. And I’m so glad she did!

I thoroughly enjoyed reading it and listening to some of the YouTube clips (I’ll definitely be returning to listen to the rest!). My favourite was “How Howard Shore brought out the dark side of Middle Earth.”

If you enjoy the soundtrack, head over to her blog and check out this post. I can highly recommend it. However, if you are avoiding storyline spoilers you may want to check back later 😉

https://jegoldiewrites.com/2022/04/29/howard-shore-canadian-icon-composer-orchestrator-conductor-apr-29-2022-jen-goldie/

The Lord of the Rings Question of the Week:

Photo by Hani hakkam on Pexels.com

Tolkien writes of The Last Homely House east of the Sea: “a perfect house, whether you like food or sleep, or story-telling or singing, or just sitting and thinking best, or a pleasant mixture of them all.” What would you go to Rivendell for?

I like the idea of going there and just sitting and thinking. We don’t have enough time to just sit and be still. I also like the idea of going there and writing, like someone else we know…

But I don’t doubt that I would also make time to study there: geography and maps as well as history. I wouldn’t say no to listening to a story or two, either.

Weekend Writing Prompt #265- Brevity

A word prompt to get your creativity flowing this weekend.  How you use the prompt is up to you.  Write a piece of flash fiction, a poem, a chapter for your novel…anything you like.  Or take the challenge below – there are no prizes – it’s not a competition but rather a fun writing exercise.  If you want to share what you come up with, please leave a link to it in the comments.

Word Prompt

Brevity

Challenge

wk 265 brevity

Weekend Writing Prompt #265: This weekend your challenge is to write a poem or a piece of prose in exactly 12 words using the word “Brevity”.

The challenge is simple: each week you will be given an exact number of words you can use to write a poem or piece of prose.  You can use any format or style you like; go wherever your inspiration takes you.  The only rules are these:

  • your poem / prose must contain this week’s word (see note below).  The word does not have to count towards the exact word count total – it can be in the title, or the first letters of the lines of a poem can spell it out – you can be as creative as you want as long as it’s there somewhere.
  • the length of your poem / prose must match the number of words stated in this week’s challenge.  No more.  No less.
  • A note on the word: you can use any variation of the word (for example: call, calls, calling, called etc).  If you find you are struggling to use this week’s word you may substitute it for a synonym – just include a note to explain the swap.  Remember, this is supposed to be fun! 🙂

Can’t wait to read what you have come up with!


Whispers and Echoes – is an online journal of short writing – read it here *
Check out the journal’s submission guidelines here – now open for general submissions

Weekend Writing Prompt Year 1 Anthology: Outcast and Other Words – Read for free here

Tolkien Tuesday #23…on a Thursday

~ 23 June 2022 ~

It’s been one of those weeks and truly I have no idea where my time has gone these past few days. But here we are, about to finish Book 1 of The Fellowship of the Ring, and conclude the first part of our journey. Can you believe we’ve been on this slow re-read for half a year? So grab a mug of something nice – as always, I’m drinking tea – and let’s begin…

The Reading, and Ensuing Thoughts

This week we finish Chapter 12: Flight to the Ford, and Book 1 of The Fellowship of the Ring!

Frodo, Sam and Strider follow Merry and Pippin further along the path to where they spotted the trolls. But it isn’t long before Strider, teasing the younger hobbits, shows that the trolls were the very same ones turned to stone while Bilbo was on his own adventure. Sam recites a poem he made up about trolls and Frodo declares he is learning a lot about Sam Gamgee.

The company continue on their journey, all in better spirits than they have been for some time and with Frodo feeling a little better. They come across a runestone marking where the dwarves and Bilbo hid their treasure and Frodo declares Bilbo gave all his treasure away.

Photo by Darwis Alwan on Pexels.com

Now back on the Road they are once more uneasy. As they are looking for a safe place to make camp, they hear the sound of hooves on the Road behind them. Hiding, they fear the approach of Black Riders, but it turns out to be Glorfindel, an Elf-lord that lives in Rivendell.

Glorfindel shares all the news he knows. Gandalf has still not arrived at Rivendell. There are five Black Riders chasing the company down and he suspects the other four may be lying in wait ahead. Knowing the danger they are in, Glorfindel, now taking over the role as guide from Strider, urges them on. He insists Frodo rides his horse, Asfaloth, who has the best chance of bearing him to safety should they encounter the enemy.

For the next couple of days, Glorfindel pushes them on, even though they are weary and exhausted. Concern for Frodo and his wound, and the peril he fears both in front and behind them, drives him.

They are a mile from the Ford when the sound of pursuit reaches them. Glorfindel tells his horse to swiftly bear Frodo away, as five Black Riders come into sight. As the horse does as it has been commanded, another four Black Riders appear ahead of Frodo, but Asfaloth outpaces them all and crosses the Ford.

Frodo, now delirious with exhaustion and the effects of his wound, is only barely conscious to see the river rise up against the Black Riders and their horses and carry them away. After that, he knows no more.

I loved this part of the story, especially with the crossover with The Hobbit. Strider really gets to show his humorous side with the trolls and this injection of levity amid so much danger is welcome. The tone in this scene with the trolls also reminds me more of The Hobbit. I’ve been thinking a lot over recent weeks of the opening stage of both Frodo and Bilbo’s journey, and I’m sorely tempted to begin reading the opening chapters of The Hobbit again.

Next week: Do we look back and reflect on Book 1 or do we jump straight into Chapter 1 of Book 2? If no-one states any preferences in the comments, we will just carry on reading 🙂

Middle Earth Musings and Meditations

Glorfindel has always been one of my favourite characters from The Lord of the Rings (and beyond), and every time I read this section of the book, I relive the disappointment I felt the first time I saw The Fellowship of the Ring and realised he wasn’t coming to help rescue the hobbits and Strider from the Black Riders. And although I’ve loved the films since that very first time seeing them, this slight change to the story has stayed with me, more so than not getting to see the Barrow-Downs in the movies.

I understand why his role is taken over by Arwen for the film, and I think she does a great job of it, and of course, it’s great to see a female character doing wonderful things in such a male-dominated story (though to be honest, this doesn’t bother me in the least). After all, we have to remember that Tolkien and Peter Jackson were producing a different end product for a different audience who had different expectations.

If you could have a character, scene or setting which was not included in the film, included in it, who, what or where would it be?

Elsewhere

In last week’s Tolkien Tuesday #22 post, I mentioned that I stumbled across a DVD in a charity shop called “Creating The Lord of the Rings Symphony: A composer’s journey through Middle Earth”.

Since posting that, I have watched it and thoroughly enjoyed it. I loved listening to the music, hearing the explanations given by Howard Shore, and seeing the artwork which was chosen to accompany it. And as we’ve mentioned before regarding the films, you can take one element from it, in this case the music, and feel very much connected to the story and see it play out in your mind’s eye. All the elements are just so wonderfully interconnected.

If you’re a fan of the film soundtrack, I wholeheartedly recommend it.

The Lord of the Rings Question of the Week:

Photo by Suzy Hazelwood on Pexels.com

What’s your favourite quote (or one of your favourite quotes) from Book 1 of The Fellowship of the Ring?

Like every other reader, no doubt, I have so many favourite quotes from what we have read so far. I shared a couple of them along our journey, but thought it would be good to share one I haven’t yet mentioned.

So I picked this one, which I find very moving, from the first half of Chapter 12, when Frodo asks Strider if he has often been to Rivendell:

“There my heart is; but it is not my fate to sit in peace, even in the fair house of Elrond.”

Cold and Grey

Photo by Vlad Bagacian on Pexels.com
Give me the cold and grey
The picturesque monotone
Of a watercolour painting
Brush strokes in variations of
British weather

Enchant me with silver skies
Charm me with hard granite and rocky outcrops
Offer me storm clouds as love tokens
And downpours as a sign you're missing me
Give me the cold and grey

Written for Weekend Writing Prompt #264: Picturesque | Word count: 54

Weekend Writing Prompt #264- Picturesque

A word prompt to get your creativity flowing this weekend.  How you use the prompt is up to you.  Write a piece of flash fiction, a poem, a chapter for your novel…anything you like.  Or take the challenge below – there are no prizes – it’s not a competition but rather a fun writing exercise.  If you want to share what you come up with, please leave a link to it in the comments.

Word Prompt

Picturesque

Challenge

wk 264 picturesque

Weekend Writing Prompt #264: This weekend your challenge is to write a poem or a piece of prose in exactly 54 words using the word “Picturesque”.

The challenge is simple: each week you will be given an exact number of words you can use to write a poem or piece of prose.  You can use any format or style you like; go wherever your inspiration takes you.  The only rules are these:

  • your poem / prose must contain this week’s word (see note below).  The word does not have to count towards the exact word count total – it can be in the title, or the first letters of the lines of a poem can spell it out – you can be as creative as you want as long as it’s there somewhere.
  • the length of your poem / prose must match the number of words stated in this week’s challenge.  No more.  No less.
  • A note on the word: you can use any variation of the word (for example: call, calls, calling, called etc).  If you find you are struggling to use this week’s word you may substitute it for a synonym – just include a note to explain the swap.  Remember, this is supposed to be fun! 🙂

Can’t wait to read what you have come up with!


Whispers and Echoes – is an online journal of short writing – read it here *
Check out the journal’s submission guidelines here – now open for general submissions

* And don’t miss our special call with guest editor Bartholomew Barker – Sorta-Sonnets – click for details *


Weekend Writing Prompt Year 1 Anthology: Outcast and Other Words – Read for free here

Sorta-Sonnets…can I write one?

You might have heard that over on Whispers and Echoes, we currently have a very special open call: Sorta-Sonnets from Guest Editor, Bartholomew Barker.

The call has been open for a few weeks now (and closes on the 24th June 2022), and since then I’ve been wondering if I am able to write one. Those who have been here a while will know I do try and write some poetry, mainly free verse, sometimes haikus. And I have been lucky enough to have had some of my poetry published. However, I have never in my life written a sonnet. But can I write a sorta-sonnet?

I’m going to try.

Bartholomew Barker explained in the submissions call post what the rules are for a sorta-sonnet:

  • 14 line poem
  • under 100 words
  • no rhyme

Nice. Simple. Clear instructions. And best of all, there’s no need to get to grips with a particular meter and rhyming scheme. It sounds do-able…

So here’s my first attempt at a sorta-sonnet:

Photo by James Wheeler on Pexels.com

These Words

I craft worlds out of words
That only exist in my head
These words build cities and
Grow gardens, make history as
Well as bake cakes
These words that create
Transform into people, with
Thoughts and actions all their own
And so my words become theirs
Or is it the other way around?
These words...their voices
My craft...their art
My daydreams...their adventures
All inside my head

Tolkien Tuesday #22

~ 14 June 2022 ~

The sun has been shining, and the temperature steadily rising, so I’ve been sitting outside reading and writing this week’s Tolkien Tuesday post, which you know, is quite a civilised way to spend an afternoon…

The Reading, and Ensuing Thoughts

This week we begin Chapter 12: Flight to the Ford

Frodo regains consciousness to find he is still clutching the ring. The fire has been banked high and the other hobbits are close by, concerned. Of Strider there is no sign, but soon he returns to say there is no sign of the Black Riders, who are not at their full compliment. He fears it’s only a matter of time before they attack again in the knowledge they have dealt Frodo a grievous wound. Strider tries his best to help Frodo with the use of the leaves of the Athelas plant, but its healing against such a wound is limited.

They spend the night watching over Frodo and keeping watch against further attacks. With the daylight they know they must continue on. This begins a long and arduous crossing of a wild and pathless land. Frodo has to be carried by the pony for most of it, for he has lost the use of his arm and shoulder.

Of the enemy they see or hear no sign of them, except when they are starting out: a cry answered by another. The terror this, along with the attack at Weathertop, inflicts is enough for them to fear the hours of darkness, over which they must stand watch in pairs.

On the sixth day out from Weathertop, they must return to the Road, and cross the Last Bridge over the River Hoarwell. Strider and Sam go on ahead to see if the bridge is being watched, it isn’t, but Strider finds a beryl elf-stone. This he takes a sign that the bridge is safe to cross, though he is unclear if it was purposefully placed, and if so by who.

On the other side of the bridge they once more leave the Road behind them and enter a wooded, hilly country. Again the going is difficult, but they eventually find a path which leads to the door of a troll-hole, which Strider and Merry investigate and determine it has long been abandoned. They continue along the path, Pippin and Merry going on ahead as the former wants to prove to Strider he’s no longer afraid. However, they return quickly, and in a panic. They have spotted some trolls up ahead.

This was a tense passage to read. The fear the hobbits feel, and the aura of concern coming from Strider, at the possibility that they are being pursued by Black Riders, whom they can’t locate and have no idea where they are, is palpable. All this whilst at the same time worrying about Frodo and trying to make it across uninviting and inhospitable terrain is so suspenseful.

Next week we conclude the last chapter of Book 1, Chapter 12: Flight to the Ford.

Middle Earth Musings and Meditations

I’ve been musing this week on how landscape has been used in the story so far, and interestingly it’s not only present to document the geography of the journey.

In the earlier chapters, we are presented with a familiar landscape, whether that’s familiar because its one we ourselves inhabit, or if not, it’s one we recognise. This helps to ensure the reader connects the Shire with home. The hobbits home and our home. The Shire is special and we feel that as we read the story. We understand why the hobbits long to return home.

But as the story moves on, the landscape is given another use. It is a vehicle for the hobbits, and of course, the reader, to learn about the history of Middle Earth. We’ve see the burial places of the first kings of men in Middle Earth, standing stones, the ruins of a once great watchtower, ruins of settlements long since forgotten to time…

The landscape also helps to introduce less familiar things, more fantastical things into the story. In The Old Forest a bitter tree dwells, and where the house of Tom Bombadil and Goldberry is to be found, and wooded hills and rocky cliffs in which are built doors to troll-holes…The landscapes maybe familiar, but the things hidden in them are not as tangible to us.

Elsewhere

This weekend I stumbled across a DVD in a charity shop called “Creating The Lord of the Rings Symphony: A composer’s journey through Middle Earth”. As a fan of the soundtrack this was something I could not pass up and I am eagerly awaiting watching it. And when I do, I shall share my thoughts here 🙂

This is what it says on the back of the DVD:

Creating The Lord of the Rings Symphony includes excerpts of live concert footage from The Lord of the Rings Symphony: Six Movements for Orchestra, Chorus and Soloists, documentary commentary by Howard Shore, and the illustrations of Alan Lee and John Howe. The concert footage was recorded live at Salle Wilfred-Pelletier, Place des Arts, Montreal. Canada in February 2004.

The Lord of the Rings Question of the Week:

In this first half of the chapter, we cover a lot of ground, from Weathertop to the Trollshaws. If you could tarry (in safety) and explore any of the places seen or visited, which would you choose?

The ancient stone walls and ruined towers seen after they crossed the Last Bridge. There is something quite evocative about buildings left to decay in an abandoned, lonely landscape.

Regular visitors to this blog will know I love nothing more than exploring ruins…