My Weekend in Pictures

A day out yesterday to Melton Mowbray to see family, where we visited the local parish church in the heart of the town, before heading off to see the Victorian market (sadly no pictures, it was getting too dark by then).  Perhaps the highlight of the day was listening to tracks from the soundtrack of the Lord of the Rings film trilogy on the way home.  Great stuff!

Then today we went to a local water mill and small nature reserve and indulged in hot chocolate and mince pies.  Mmm…that certainly warmed us through 🙂

Amongst the Ruins – Monday Inspiration

Continuing on with the recent theme of the spirit of place, I thought I would post about another place that I find incredibly inspiring, one that I had the chance to visit again over the bank holiday: a ruined and roofless church in Bedfordshire…

The church for the now vanished village of Segenhoe was dedicated to All Saints, the earliest parts of which date to the late Anglo-Saxon period.  This quiet corner is the perfect place to indulge in a little inspiration – and a cup of tea 🙂  It was raining during our visit, and the colours chosen for the photos matched the moody, gothic atmosphere perfectly…

In Search of Inspiration

Last weekend we stopped by a tiny village church in the care of the Churches Conservation Trust, St Margaret of Antioch, Knotting, Bedfordshire.

It is a beautiful little church and has always been so quiet and peaceful when we have visited it, and so is a great place to write a little poetry, a few inspired paragraphs or pieces of flash fiction.

The earliest part of the building is Norman and there are areas of the churchyard that are a full of wild flowers, making it a haven for butterflies and bees…

St Margaret of Antioch, Knotting 3

St Margaret of Antioch, Knotting 2

St Margaret of Antioch, Knotting

St Margaret of Antioch, KNotting 5

St Margaret of Antioch, Knotting 4

 

Gargoyles and Grotesques

I have always loved and been inspired by church architecture, and one feature of churches that I love above all others are grotesques.

Grotesques are stone carvings, often strange, distorted or fantastical in appearance.  Their purpose was said to be twofold: to protect a building by frightening away evil spirits and to serve as a reminder to parishioners of the ever-present danger of falling into evil.

I took this photo of the grotesque in St Michaels and All Angels, Edmondthorpe, Leicestershire a couple of weeks ago.

I took this photo of the grotesque in St Michaels and All Angels, Edmondthorpe, Leicestershire a couple of weeks ago.  This church is in the care of The Churches Conservation Trust.

Gargoyles are a form of grotesque, the difference that separates them is that a gargoyle will have a water spout coming out of its mouth in order to direct water away from the sides of a building, where over time it will cause damage.

This is one of the gargoyles from St Peters church in Tempsford, Bedfordshire.  You can just see the start of the water pipe protruding from its mouth...

This is one of the gargoyles from St Peters church in Tempsford, Bedfordshire. You can just see the start of the water pipe protruding from its mouth…

The same carving as above, showing the water spout and face of the gargoyle...

The same carving as above, showing the water spout and face of the gargoyle…