Tolkien Tuesday #35

~ 27 September 2022 ~

Welcome to another Tolkien Tuesday. The weather is getting cooler and damper here as we move towards the darker half of the year in the northern hemisphere. And I must admit, on the whole, I prefer the colder, darker months. I like being cosy. I like reading underneath a blanket. I like sitting in the dark surrounded by candles. I also like autumn walks. I like to see the changing colours and to kick up leaves…

So grab a cup of something nice – like always, I’m drinking tea – and let’s discuss this week’s reading.

And just a thought, if anyone has any ideas for guest posts, or questions, or areas they want covered in future discussions, suggestions are always welcome. One of my favourite aspects of this group read-along is the community feel of it.

The Reading, and Ensuing Thoughts

This week we finished Book 2, Chapter 6: Lothlorien.

Photo by Johannes Plenio on Pexels.com

Legolas offers to climb one of the trees to see if the rest could follow him up so they can sleep more safely off the woodland floor. However, just as he takes hold of the first branch, a voice from overhead causes him to start.

It is a group of three elven watchers. They heard the company earlier and have been tracking them and listening to Legolas singing. Having been made aware of their journey by Elrond, who sent out messengers as far across the land as he could, they befriend the company, even Gimli, if Legolas and Aragorn will guard him.

That night, the hobbits sleep on a flet in one tree with the elven guards, while the rest of the company sleeps in the next one. Sometime in the night, Frodo is woken by the sound of many feet moving through the forest and he is told it is a company of orcs.

Alone and the only one awake, Frodo thinks he can hear movement at the base of the tree. He spots a shadowy figure, but it quickly disappears. This time another sees it, Haldir the elf, but he could not risk shooting whoever or whatever it was.

The next day they walk further into Lothlorien, until they must cross the Silverlode, which the elves call Celebrant. Once on the other side they are in the Naith of Lorien and strangers must go blindfolded. Gimli, being a dwarf, is the only one who is required to do so, but he refuses. He says it is unfair and is as unlikely to betray the elves as Legolas. However, Haldir has no choice in the matter. It is the law. So Aragorn says for them all to go blindfolded.

All that day they walk blindfolded. At midday the next day, they meet a company of elves heading north to strengthen the northern defences. They also bring with them news. The orcs that entered woodland have almost been destroyed, and the rest are being pursued. Lady Galadriel has also sent word that all of the company should walk without blindfolds. Haldir apologises to Gimli.

They have now reached Cerin Amroth and must wait until dusk before going on. Haldir, on noticing they can feel the power of Lady Galadriel on the woodland, offers to take Frodo and Sam up the hill. Frodo “felt he was in a timeless land that did not fade or change or fall into forgetfulness.” At the top of the hill they climb up to the platform and look out over the forest. Where Lady Galadriel’s power reaches all is bright and golden, but beyond the borders of her country, the world seems dark and full of shadow.

When they return to the bottom of the hill, Frodo finds Aragorn lost in a living memory. He looks younger, is wearing other clothes, and is speaking to someone Frodo cannot see. He utters the name “Arwen”. Once the memory is over, Aragorn, smiling, explains, “Here is the heart of Elvendom on earth…and here my heart dwells ever, unless there be a light beyond the dark roads that we still must tread, you and I.”

Next week we will start Book 2, Chapter 7: The Mirror of Galadriel

Middle Earth Musings and Meditations

My musings this week were very brief and pretty random:

The first was that we have entered a magical place, with lots of water, which has the power to heal. This is indeed needed after the darkness and grief of Moria.

Photo by Pixabay on Pexels.com

The perception of Lothlorien from without is of a dangerous place from where men don’t return, which worries Boromir (this is not the first time Boromir has worried over their choice of road). There is an element here of a magical place, an ancient place, a powerful place which means it must be a dangerous one. I might writer further on this in the next post, but I’ll stop here for fear of spoilers 😉

Stepping in to Lothlorien feels like stepping into a dream. You feel the magic. You can sense the magic. What you see is remarkable and yet you know, without that magic it would not be as you see it.

There are parallels between Lorien and the world of the fae in folklore, not only because elves dwell here – note how different Rivendell feels compared to Lorien – but this is very much a magic world existing in and between another place. Also, there is an aspect of if you cross over the border to this place, it will change you.

Elsewhere

Nothing to add here this week…except that at some point soon, I will be adding an index page for these posts to make it easier to for those who maybe miss a week or two to find previous posts…

The Lord of the Rings Question of the Week:

What are your thoughts on how the elves treated Gimli?

I always feel affronted and insulted on Gimli’s behalf, because he is being treated with age-old prejudice. Another point that doesn’t sit well with me is that no-one has thought to tell Gimli the terms of the agreement which concern him. However, Haldir isn’t particularly happy himself when it comes to the blindfolding, but there is little he can do about it, and he does apologise at the earliest opportunity.

I can understand the anger Gimli feels, and the need he has to stand up for himself and call into question how unfairly he is being treated.

I am also always a little surprised when Legolas complains when it is first suggested that he should where a blindfold. Yet he does drop his argument quickly.

That being said, I also understand the elves wanting to protect their home and their people. After all, the world they live in is an increasingly dangerous one.

Weekend Writing Prompt #278- Viable

A word prompt to get your creativity flowing this weekend.  How you use the prompt is up to you.  Write a piece of flash fiction, a poem, a chapter for your novel…anything you like.  Or take the challenge below – there are no prizes – it’s not a competition but rather a fun writing exercise.  If you want to share what you come up with, please leave a link to it in the comments.

Word Prompt

Viable

Challenge

wk 278 viable

Weekend Writing Prompt #278: This weekend your challenge is to write a poem or a piece of prose in exactly 82 words using the word “Viable”.

The challenge is simple: each week you will be given an exact number of words you can use to write a poem or piece of prose.  You can use any format or style you like; go wherever your inspiration takes you.  The only rules are these:

  • your poem / prose must contain this week’s word (see note below).  The word does not have to count towards the exact word count total – it can be in the title, or the first letters of the lines of a poem can spell it out – you can be as creative as you want as long as it’s there somewhere.
  • the length of your poem / prose must match the number of words stated in this week’s challenge.  No more.  No less.
  • A note on the word: you can use any variation of the word (for example: call, calls, calling, called etc).  If you find you are struggling to use this week’s word you may substitute it for a synonym – just include a note to explain the swap.  Remember, this is supposed to be fun! 🙂

Can’t wait to read what you have come up with!


Whispers and Echoes – is an online journal of short writing – read it here *

Weekend Writing Prompt Year 1 Anthology: Outcast and Other Words – Read for free here

Tolkien Tuesday #34

~ 20 September 2022 ~

The weather has turned more autumnal here. The leaves have started to change their leaves and the temperatures are getting cooler. It’s my favourite time of year, and is perfectly paired with a big cup of tea, a lovely scented candle (in this case, bergamot and cedarwood) and of course, a good book…though to be honest, I think I say this about every season…

The Reading, and Ensuing Thoughts

This week we started Book 2, Chapter 6: Lothlorien.

Aragorn leads the company away from the mountains, but not before he expresses his feelings of hopelessness at Gandalf’s passing, and Gimli shakes his fist at the cruelty of Caradhras for forcing them to take the path through the mines.

Gimli spots the Mirrormere but they cannot stop. A little while later he spots Durin’s Stone and begs a brief moment to turn aside and see it. Frodo and Sam accompany him, and each look into the Mirrormere.

Heading south, they go on. Aragorn says he plans follow the way Gandalf had chosen. They will follow the Silverlode, through the forest of Lothlorien, and on to The Great River, the Anduin. Legolas is looking forward to seeing Lothlorien, but he wishes it had been spring.

Sam and Frodo, injured by the battle in the chamber, begin to fall behind. Aragorn and Boromir carry them until they can find somewhere safe to rest. When they stop, Aragorn tends first Sam, then Frodo. While tending to the latter the secret of the mithril coat is revealed, and Merry announces he loves Bilbo even more for giving it to Frodo.

Now rested, they push on once more until night falls, going in silence. Frodo walking with Gimli, thinks he can hear someone or something following, then possibly catches sight of two eyes. But when he mentions it to Gimli, he listens but cannot hear anything.

Photo by mali maeder on Pexels.com

They eventually reach the border of Lothlorien. Boromir is a little uneasy about the woods, for there are strange tales said about it in Gondor, but he agrees to enter it with the others. They enter the woods, travelling a mile into the forest, before they turn aside and find a resting place. They cross the Nimrodel and feel rested.

Once they are camped, Legolas sings a song of Nimrodel and her lover Amroth, of whom neither were heard from again. Legolas then tells them of his Elven kin who live in the treetops of the forest, and Gimli recommends that for that night, they do likewise.

In this section, I found I was most drawn to Gimli, and that here he felt a little more like a main character than he has so far. I suppose this goes back further, to just before they entered Moria. He is walking amongst his own people’s history and the joy of that is severely tempered by the events of their journey. He says one of my favourite lines from this half-chapter, “I hear nothing but the night-speech of plant and stone.” I can’t help but wonder, what are they saying?

And as these past few chapters have spoken of Gimli and the history and legacy of the dwarves, you can feel the focus transitioning to Legolas, his people, and the history and legacy of the elves.

Next week we will finish Book 2, Chapter 6: Lothlorien.

Middle Earth Musings and Meditations

This week my thoughts wandered over the differences in how the events of this half-chapter were portrayed in the film compared with the book, most notably on who the focus lay.

In the film, in the immediate aftermath of their flight from Moria, it is the hobbits who are predominantly shown as overcome with grief and crying. And, I’ve always found it to be one of the most poignant moments in the film. Every time I have watched the film, I have felt their grief and understood their pain.

However, in the book, we are given little insight into what the hobbits are feeling or how they are reacting to the loss of Gandalf. It’s not until they have started once more on their journey that it is said of Frodo, “…drawn by the still blue water in spite of hurt and weariness…”

It’s interesting that as younger reader, I would have felt a stronger reaction to the one portrayed in the film. Yet now it is Gimli’s impotent, grief-stricken angry fist shaking at Caradhras that moves me more today. That, and Aragorn’s despondency.

Elsewhere

Photo by Polina Tankilevitch on Pexels.com

Don’t forget that 22nd September is Hobbit Day! Falling on 22nd September, it celebrates both Bilbo’s and Frodo’s birthday.

The Lord of the Rings Question of the Week:

Which of the geographical water features would you chose from those we have read about this half-chapter? The Mirrormere, the Silverlode, or the Nimrodel?

To be honest, I would like to visit all three, but if I had to choose, I think there is something quite magical about the Mirrormere. A meeting of water and stars, and reflections that alter the real world, the lake was said to be a place of prophecy and vision (Tolkien The Illustrated Encyclopedia, David Day, pg 64). Durin was said to have looked into the water and seen a crown of stars above his head, even though it was daylight.

Yet I love woodland rivers and streams, especially at this time of year. I love the intersection between earth and water, and that in itself is really quite magical too.

Weekend Writing Prompt #277- Renege

A word prompt to get your creativity flowing this weekend.  How you use the prompt is up to you.  Write a piece of flash fiction, a poem, a chapter for your novel…anything you like.  Or take the challenge below – there are no prizes – it’s not a competition but rather a fun writing exercise.  If you want to share what you come up with, please leave a link to it in the comments.

Word Prompt

Renege

Challenge

wk 277 renege

Weekend Writing Prompt #277: This weekend your challenge is to write a poem or a piece of prose in exactly 49 words using the word “Renege”.

The challenge is simple: each week you will be given an exact number of words you can use to write a poem or piece of prose.  You can use any format or style you like; go wherever your inspiration takes you.  The only rules are these:

  • your poem / prose must contain this week’s word (see note below).  The word does not have to count towards the exact word count total – it can be in the title, or the first letters of the lines of a poem can spell it out – you can be as creative as you want as long as it’s there somewhere.
  • the length of your poem / prose must match the number of words stated in this week’s challenge.  No more.  No less.
  • A note on the word: you can use any variation of the word (for example: call, calls, calling, called etc).  If you find you are struggling to use this week’s word you may substitute it for a synonym – just include a note to explain the swap.  Remember, this is supposed to be fun! 🙂

Can’t wait to read what you have come up with!


Whispers and Echoes – is an online journal of short writing – read it here *

Weekend Writing Prompt Year 1 Anthology: Outcast and Other Words – Read for free here

Tolkien Tuesday #33

~ 13 September 2022 ~

The Reading, and Ensuing Thoughts

This week we finished Book 2, Chapter 5: The Bridge of Khazad-dum.

As the company flee down the staircase in the pitch dark, Gandalf remains to try and seal the door behind them. Not long after, a flash of white, and Gandalf comes flying down the stairs claiming he has met his match. They continue on in the darkness.

After an hour, Gandalf must rest. While seated he explained what happened. He had faced something he had not met before, something that terrified the orcs, something that possessed its own magic. In the ensuing battle of wills, the door broke into pieces and the roof collapsed sealing their exit.

Briefly rested, they go on; they can see light ahead of them and it’s red. The passage ends at an archway into another hall from where the red glow is coming. They believe the cause to be fire. Gandalf alone steps through and on his return announces, “There is some new devilry here…”. But he knows where they are and explains it’s not far to the outside.

The drums, horns and orc cries sound again. Now they must run the length of the hall, the distance being greater than they first thought. They are spotted and pursued. Arrows are flying everywhere. At the end of the hall, the floor falls away and a gaping chasm is suddenly before them. It can only be crossed by a very narrow bridge. They must cross it in single file, and Gandalf explains the way out is just a little further beyond it.

Behind them there is a whole host of orcs, and those with bows are using them. Legolas goes to return fire when he spots a shadow coming up behind the orcs and is filled with terror. It was wreathed in flame and trailing black smoke. It’s a balrog.

A random photo of a bridge 😉
Photo by Jacob Colvin on Pexels.com

Gandalf, already tired, insists the others must cross the bridge whilst he holds it. Once they are all in relative safety on the other side, Gandalf stands in the middle of the bridge. The balrog steps on to the bridge and begins to battle the wizard. Aragorn and Boromir return with the aim of helping him, but Gandalf, using his staff breaks the stone of the bridge. It collapses beneath the balrog, but its whip ensnares Gandalf and pulls him into the chasm too.

Aragorn leads the company out of the mountains, into the Dimrill Dale. It is the middle of the day, the sunlight bright, but in the shadow of the mountains they can still hear the distant drumbeat. Safe, they grieve for Gandalf.

Next week we will begin Book 2, Chapter 6: Lothlorien.

Middle Earth Musings and Meditations

Although they have already faced danger on this journey, this is the first time they have been faced with grief. And this week, I have a few reminiscences to share…

I remember the first time I read this passage (I was about 11 years old). To say I was stunned would be an understatement. I recall getting to the end of the chapter and just slowly closing the book. It wasn’t so much that I thought I couldn’t go on reading it (I knew I would), but I did feel like I needed a little time to get to grips with this. I hadn’t expected it at all.

Gandalf was a wizard. Wizards had spells and magic. That surely meant Gandalf couldn’t die, didn’t it? If one of the others had been pulled into the chasm with the balrog, it would have been sad, of course, but I think it would have been less shocking to the eleven year old me.

I also remember thinking that without a wizard, who was going to protect the company if they reached another point where, “Swords are no more use here,”? I was more than a little concerned for the Fellowship, I can tell you. Yet, that’s the very reason that spurred me on to carry on with the story. How were they going to get over this? I knew they had to because the book was very big, and we weren’t halfway through it. The reasoning of an 11 year old still makes much sense today. 🙂

Elsewhere

As we met our first balrog in this half a chapter, I thought it would be well to suggest a reading of the FAQs page on The Tolkien Society website, especially the FAQ which discusses that favourite Middle Earth question: “Do balrogs have wings? Can they fly?”

This also ties in to this week’s question of the week…

The Lord of the Rings Question of the Week:

Let’s talk balrogs this week. I want to know your thoughts about them, your reaction to them and what you think of Tolkien’s descriptions of them.

To me, balrogs have always come across with a terrifying majesty about them. They are ancient. They are powerful. And though the descriptions we have of the balrog in this chapter are truly magnificent in telling us how it looks, it is how others react to it that I find the most interesting. Legolas is filled with terror and wails. Gimli drops his axe. Gandalf falters and leans heavily on his staff. And as for the orcs, although they are on the same side, they are clearly afraid of it too. It’s these descriptions that really show us how terrible it is to face a balrog.

What would the hobbits have thought on seeing it? We aren’t told in this chapter. When all other members of the company have done their fair share of fighting already, the hobbits have seen very little and done even less. Coming from such a sheltered background, they have only recently seen ringwraiths, barrow- wights, orcs and wargs, and only hours before participated in their first proper fight. Balrogs must be beyond their imagining.

What I’ve always found interesting is the question: do balrogs have wings. In one passage Tolkien writes: “…and the shadow about it reached out like two vast wings”, yet two paragraphs later he wrote, “…and its wings were spread from wall to wall”. I’ve always taken these statements to mean, balrogs do have wings (though I don’t think of them as wings fit for flying). In the first quote, these wings are hinted at, ill-defined, suggested but not conclusively there, and it’s not until the second quote when the balrog draws itself up to its full height that the wings are very much there and on display, the revealing of which is used to terrible effect. I’m not sure everyone would agree with my reasoning though…

Weekend Writing Prompt #276- Bandage

A word prompt to get your creativity flowing this weekend.  How you use the prompt is up to you.  Write a piece of flash fiction, a poem, a chapter for your novel…anything you like.  Or take the challenge below – there are no prizes – it’s not a competition but rather a fun writing exercise.  If you want to share what you come up with, please leave a link to it in the comments.

Word Prompt

Bandage

Challenge

wk 276 bandage

Weekend Writing Prompt #276: This weekend your challenge is to write a poem or a piece of prose in exactly 61 words using the word “Bandage”.

The challenge is simple: each week you will be given an exact number of words you can use to write a poem or piece of prose.  You can use any format or style you like; go wherever your inspiration takes you.  The only rules are these:

  • your poem / prose must contain this week’s word (see note below).  The word does not have to count towards the exact word count total – it can be in the title, or the first letters of the lines of a poem can spell it out – you can be as creative as you want as long as it’s there somewhere.
  • the length of your poem / prose must match the number of words stated in this week’s challenge.  No more.  No less.
  • A note on the word: you can use any variation of the word (for example: call, calls, calling, called etc).  If you find you are struggling to use this week’s word you may substitute it for a synonym – just include a note to explain the swap.  Remember, this is supposed to be fun! 🙂

Can’t wait to read what you have come up with!


Whispers and Echoes – is an online journal of short writing – read it here *

Weekend Writing Prompt Year 1 Anthology: Outcast and Other Words – Read for free here

The City of Fallen Dreams

My latest novel (or the first draft of it, at any rate), is available to read, for free, via Wattpad. So what is it about?

The City of Fallen Dreams is the first book in the After The Rising series. And interestingly enough, it had its first incarnation on this blog as the unfinished serialised story, On The Run, from 2017. There is very little left of the original story, of which I had written about 2000 words, but the new version, which comes in at around 52,000 words, used that original opening to create the world the story is set in.

I had so much fun writing this story. So much so that I’ve already started writing the sequel. It has a little bit of everything in it: paranormal, dystopian, mystery, magic, romance, action, adventure, historical, political intrigue and more besides…

Here’s the story summary:

What do a tarot reader, a violinist, a schoolboy and a detective all have in common? They are all trying to make a life for themselves after The Rising. But it’s not easy.

Three of them are on the wrong side of the authorities. One’s a prisoner. One’s on the run. One’s leading the resistance.

As for the other one? He works for the authorities. It’s his job to find two of them, and as for the third…she might be locked up, but her heart is proving to be the most elusive out of the lot.

But that’s not all. A Time of Mirroring approaches, according to The Temple in The Grove. And who doesn’t like a prophecy? Well, a lot of people aren’t going to like this one.

The City of Fallen Dreams is a dystopian fantasy where ancient spirituality and the modern world meet but don’t mingle. Not yet, at any rate.

You can read The City of Fallen Dreams by either clicking the book cover at the top of the post or by following this link. If you do have a read of it, I really hope you enjoy it.

Tolkien Tuesday #32

~ 06 September 2022 ~

A short half chapter for this week’s Tolkien Tuesday. I had thought to combine the two instalments of Chapter 5 together and write a single post, thinking I wouldn’t have enough to fill two post, but no fear! When it comes to The Lord of The Rings, I always have plenty to say, it seems… 🙂

The Reading, and Ensuing Thoughts

This week we started Book 2, Chapter 5: The Bridge of Khazad-dum.

Photo by Jeswin Thomas on Pexels.com

On discovering the fate of Balin, the company, for a short time, indulge in some personal reflection. Then they begin to study the chamber and realise a battle had taken place here. A book is found which Gandalf begins to read; it is a record of the fortunes of those who travelled with Balin to re-take Moria. Starting roughly 30 years ago, Gandalf reads aloud from pages which are the least damaged. One of the events he shares is the death of Balin, after which, Moria is over run with orcs. The last entry informs them that the surviving dwarves perished a few days later in a last stand in the chamber they are in.

Gandalf tells Gimli to keep the book and if he can, return it to Dain, King Under The Mountain. Geographically, Gandalf knows exactly where they are, and knows the way they must go: back into the hall and towards the eastern arch.

However, the sound of drumming is suddenly heard, so loud and deep in the earth that it causes the ground beneath their feet to shake. To answer this, horns begin blowing and harsh cries sound. They can hear the scurrying of many feet. The irony of being caught in a similar trap to the dwarves they’ve just been reading about is not lost on them.

Gandalf decides to close the western door to the chamber, leaving the eastern one open for their escape. Then he steps out into the hall and challenges the orcs, before using his staff to cast a spell. Returning, he declares that not only are there a great many orcs but at least one cave troll as well.

Aragorn, guarding the eastern door, tells them there is no noise coming from this exit, and that there is an staircase that leads down. However, they must delay their attackers or fear being chased wherever the steps lead.

Boromir bars the western door but it is opened by a cave troll, which Frodo attacks with sting. The cave troll recoiling, Boromir bars the door again. However, it is broken down and the room fills with orcs and the fighting is fierce. When the orcs flee to regroup, Gandalf says it is time for them to make their escape. As they are leaving, Frodo has a spear thrust at him by an orc-chieftain, and they fear him dead. Aragorn picks him up and then almost drops him when Frodo starts talking. They start down the steps…

Next week we will finish Book 2, Chapter 5: The Bridge of Khazad-dum

Middle Earth Musings and Meditations

The power of repetition is used to good effect in this chapter, ensuring a rising sense of danger is felt by the reader.

We first encountered it in the previous chapter when Pippin dropped the stone in the well and the noise is answered by the sound of knocking. This is heightened when Gandalf reads the record of the dwarves time in Moria, especially the words: “…drums, drums in the deep…”, which they themselves hear a little while later.

Then there are the phrases, “We cannot get out”, and “They are coming”, which are repeated in the record, and then by the company themselves, (the first by Gimli, the second by Legolas), when they realise what is happening.

This mirroring of the past in the present is chilling because we’ve just read how it ended for the dwarves. And we, like the company, know what is coming…

Elsewhere

We have another link back to The Hobbit in this chapter, as well as being offered a glimpse at how poignant this part of the journey is for Gimli.

Three of the dwarves that went on the quest to retake Erebor from the dragon, Smaug, are mentioned. At the end of the last chapter, the tomb of Balin, who led the ill-fated attempt to retake Moria, is discovered. In this chapter, we read how he died, the account written by another dwarf who was part of Thorin Oakenshield’s company, Ori. Ori writes the final pages in the book the Fellowship finds, and he dies in the dwarves last stand. We also learn how Oin, brother to Gloin and so Gimli’s uncle, met his end. Let’s not forget that Balin was a kinsman of Gimli, Gloin and Balin being cousins.

The Lord of the Rings Question of the Week:

What was your favourite part or favourite quote from this week’s half chapter?

I think the phrases, “They are coming,” and “We cannot get out,” are iconic quotes, clearly representing the danger the Fellowship is in, and so these have to be the top of my list. I like how they are used to connect the past with the present.

However, another favourite quote is Gandalf’s: “Swords are no more use here.” It lets you know that whatever is about to happen, a wizard rather than a warrior, even seasoned warriors like Aragorn, Boromir, Legolas and Gimli, is needed.

Musings from (or of) a Muse

Photo by Anjana C on Pexels.com
I try to keep her grounded
     Sensible
     Focused
But her avian superpowers
     Mental flapping and fluttering
Resist the attempt

She dreams of spreading her wings
She wants to soar

Written for: Weekend Writing Prompt #275 – Avian | Word count: 29

Weekend Writing Prompt #275- Avian

A word prompt to get your creativity flowing this weekend.  How you use the prompt is up to you.  Write a piece of flash fiction, a poem, a chapter for your novel…anything you like.  Or take the challenge below – there are no prizes – it’s not a competition but rather a fun writing exercise.  If you want to share what you come up with, please leave a link to it in the comments.

Word Prompt

Avian

Challenge

wk 275 avian

Weekend Writing Prompt #275: This weekend your challenge is to write a poem or a piece of prose in exactly 29 words using the word “Avian”.

The challenge is simple: each week you will be given an exact number of words you can use to write a poem or piece of prose.  You can use any format or style you like; go wherever your inspiration takes you.  The only rules are these:

  • your poem / prose must contain this week’s word (see note below).  The word does not have to count towards the exact word count total – it can be in the title, or the first letters of the lines of a poem can spell it out – you can be as creative as you want as long as it’s there somewhere.
  • the length of your poem / prose must match the number of words stated in this week’s challenge.  No more.  No less.
  • A note on the word: you can use any variation of the word (for example: call, calls, calling, called etc).  If you find you are struggling to use this week’s word you may substitute it for a synonym – just include a note to explain the swap.  Remember, this is supposed to be fun! 🙂

Can’t wait to read what you have come up with!


Whispers and Echoes – is an online journal of short writing – read it here *

Weekend Writing Prompt Year 1 Anthology: Outcast and Other Words – Read for free here